Reykjanes Peninsula

 

The Reykjanes Peninsula, located in southwestern Iceland, is a geologically active region straddling the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a divergent tectonic boundary. Its volcanic history spans thousands of years, with eruptive episodes characterized by effusive lava flows, the formation of shield volcanoes, and occasional explosive activity.

Location: Iceland
Coordinates: 63.889851, -22.261916

 

Reykjanes Peninsula’s Location

 

Reykjanes Peninsula Latest Status

Iceland (Svartsengi) Update: The eruption, ongoing since March 16th, remains active with lava effusion concentrated in the northern cone (5-10 cubic meters per second). Ground inflation signals continued magma influx, suggesting the eruption could persist for a significant period.

 

Reykjanes Peninsula’s Eruptive History

12th-13th centuries Multiple fissure eruptions produced extensive lava fields, including the Kapelluhraun and Eldeyjarhraun.
1783 The submarine Reykjaneshryggur eruption occurred offshore, forming a short-lived island.
1921-1924 A series of fissure eruptions in the Krýsuvík volcanic system.
2021 Fagradalsfjall: This effusive fissure eruption produced fluid basaltic lava flows over several months, building up a vast lava field and a new shield volcano. The eruption was preceded by intense seismicity and ground deformation, offering valuable insights into pre-eruptive processes.
2022-2023 Meradalir: Eruptions in the Meradalir valley followed a similar pattern to Fagradalsfjall, characterized by fountaining activity and the emission of extensive lava flows.
2024 Svartsengi: The eruption, ongoing since March 16th, remains active with lava effusion concentrated in the northern cone (5-10 cubic meters per second). Ground inflation signals continued magma influx, suggesting the eruption could persist for a significant period.

 

Reykjanes Peninsula’s Eruptive History

For monitoring information, please refer to the Icelandic Meteorological Office.

 

Images of Reykjanes Peninsula