Expedition Guatemala

Guatemala / August 2019

Guatemala, you put on an out-of-this-world show for us! Eruptions, lava flows and a spine-chilling electrical storm.

A couple weeks back, we arrived in Guatemala to explore the volcanoes of Fuego and Pacaya. We ended up getting caught up in a massive electrical storm which made global headlines. We’re all safe and back home.

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Classic South Island Snow Storm

Lewis Pass, New Zealand / June 2019

This season’s winter has been particularly mild, but with a South Island snow storm on the way, we jumped on a plane bound for Christchurch, picked up a 4×4 and headed towards the Lewis Pass where we hunkered down and waited for the storm to arrive.

It didn’t take long for the fun destroying cone deployers to be out in force, closing the road. We did however get a good dumping of snow, turning the Lewis Pass into a winter wonderland. Magic!

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Post Ambrym Eruption Expedition

Ambrym Island, Vanuatu / April 2019

As documented previously, unprecedented geological events unfolded on Ambrym Island in December 2018 which ultimately brought about the destruction of the famed lava lakes.

In April, we led the first expedition by foot to witness the dramatic changes. It’s hard to express what has unfolded up there. The intra-caldera area is hardly recognisable.

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Ambrym Island’s famed lava lakes lost

Ambrym Island, Vanuatu / March 2019

The volcanic island of Ambrym, Vanuatu is certainly a wonder of the world. There isn’t another place like it anywhere on our planet. Two imposing cones rise from the desert-like caldera, both churning with molten rock.

I have made descents within both Marum and Benbow’s cones on multiple expeditions. Anyone venturing this close to the blazing lava has felt a blazing sense of mother nature’s disinterest in us. But then it all changed…

Unprecedented geological events unfolded in December 2018 which ultimately brought about the destruction of the famed lava lakes.

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Anak Krakatau – Cone collapse and tsunami

A large part of the south-western cone of Krakatau appears to have given way. This and probable collapses undersea have caused a massive displacement of water.

One theory suggests this resulted from recent lava flows combining with accumulated material over many decades. This created a tipping point and ultimately caused the collapse. This may have exposed the conduit (the plumbing of the volcano), allowing sea water to enter and therefore causing the huge eruptive plume.

Many readers have asked to see what a large eruption could be like – we filmed this back in October.

 

Anak Krakatau Eruption Expedition

Anak Krakatau, Indonesia / October 2018

We’re back from our Indonesian expedition – to get as close as possible to the violently erupting Anak Krakatau. We had huge lava bombs crashing down on us and observed impressive vulcanian eruptions. The volcano wasn’t the only hazard – we had to contend with Komodo Dragons, pythons and landslides.

View our expedition report and footage here

Hawaii’s Kilauea eruption and lava flows

Leilani Estates, Big Island, Hawaii / May 2018

On May 3rd, 2018, a fissure opened up in Leilani Estates (Puna District, Big Island) releasing lava. Over the coming days, more fissures opened up, spewing large volumes of lava skyward. Lava soon began to accumulate and flow towards the ocean. There have been at least three separate ocean entries to date. Fissure 8 continues to be the most vigorous, with fire fountaining extending beyond 200ft.

Extreme Pursuit made the journey to Leilani and captured some extraordinary footage. View here.

Antarctica: Extremes of Earth Expedition (COLD)

We’re often venturing to the hottest places on Earth. But this time we’re trading lava lakes for icebergs and journeying to the continent that boasts the coldest, driest, and windiest place on Earth. Antarctica.

On March 14, 2008 we departed Ushuaia (the southernmost city in the world) for a ten day expedition to Antarctica. Led by Dr. Alex Cowan, our voyage would take us across the Drake Passage, towards the South Shetland Islands, and then onto the Antarctic Peninsula.

You can view a expedition report here